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Monthly Archives: January 2019

IRS Waives Penalty for Tax Withholding & ES Payments for Taxpayers Who Fell Short in 2018


WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service announced in Notice 2019-11, issued on January 16, 2019 that it is waiving the estimated tax penalty for many taxpayers whose 2018 federal income tax withholding and estimated tax payments fell short of their total tax liability for the year.

The IRS is generally waiving the penalty for any taxpayer who paid at least 85 percent of their total tax liability during the year through federal income tax withholding, quarterly estimated tax payments or a combination of the two. The usual percentage threshold is 90 percent to avoid a penalty.

The waiver computation announced today will be integrated into commercially-available tax software and reflected in the forthcoming revision of Form 2210 and instructions.

This relief is designed to help taxpayers who were unable to properly adjust their withholding and estimated tax payments to reflect an array of changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), the far-reaching tax reform law enacted in December 2017. 

"We Realize There Were Many Changes That Affected People
Last Year and This Penalty Waiver Will Help Taxpayers Who Inadvertently Didn't Have Enough Tax Withheld,"
 

said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig.

“We urge people to check their withholding again this year to make sure they are having the right amount of tax withheld for 2019.”

The updated federal tax withholding tables, released in early 2018, largely reflected the lower tax rates and the increased standard deduction brought about by the new law. This generally meant taxpayers had less tax withheld in 2018 and saw more in their paychecks.

However, the withholding tables couldn’t fully factor in other changes, such as the suspension of dependency exemptions and reduced itemized deductions. As a result, some taxpayers could have paid too little tax during the year, if they did not submit a properly-revised W-4 withholding form to their employer or increase their estimated tax payments.

For waiver purposes only, today’s relief lowers the 90 percent threshold to 85 percent. This means that a taxpayer will not owe a penalty if they paid at least 85 percent of their total 2018 tax liability.

If the taxpayer paid less than 85 percent, then they are not eligible for the waiver and the penalty will be calculated as it normally would be, using the 90 percent threshold. For further details, see Notice 2019-11.

Although the IRS won’t begin processing 2018 returns until Jan. 28, software companies and tax professionals will be accepting and preparing returns before that date.

 Have a Tax Problem?  
 




 

 

Contact the Tax Lawyers at
Marini & Associates, P.A.
 
 for a FREE Tax Consultation Contact US at
or Toll Free at 888-8TaxAid (888 882-9243).
 
 

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IRS Employees Called Back for Tax Season Without Pay

On January 8, 2019 we posted IRS Confirms Tax Filing Season to Begin January 28, where we discussed that despite the government shutdown, the Internal Revenue Service confirmed on January 7, 2019 in IR-2019-01 that it will process tax returns beginning January 28, 2019 and provide refunds to taxpayers as scheduled.

The Treasury Department has now released a revised shutdown contingency plan on January 15, 2019 calling for more than 46,000 Internal Revenue Service employees to return to work to get ready for tax filing season, but the majority of them will be unpaid until the partial government shutdown ends.

Under the previous contingency plan that has been in place since the shutdown began on Dec. 22, 2018, 88 percent of the IRS’s 80,000 employees had been sent home without pay. Under the new filing season plan released Tuesday, 46,052 employees will be back on the job starting the week of January 14, 2019; 42.6 percent of the workforce will remain furloughed.

Last week, the IRS announced that tax refunds would be processed as usual once tax season begins on January 28th, even if the shutdown lasts until then, and said it would be recalling a “significant portion” of its furloughed employees. Since then, the IRS has brought back approximately 400 furloughed employees to process income verification forms for mortgage applications, but they are being paid out of the user fees for the applications.

The union representing IRS employees, the National Treasury Employees Union, is protesting the plan to call back workers without paying them.

The NTEU filed a lawsuit last week challenging the Trump administration’s plans, saying that the executive branch can’t continue to force more and more employees to show up in exchange for just an IOU. A federal judge on January 15th, denied the NTEU’s request for an immediate temporary restraining order. The next hearing in the case is scheduled for Jan. 31st.

Have a Tax Problem?  
 




 

 

Contact the Tax Lawyers at
Marini & Associates, P.A.
 
 for a FREE Tax Consultation Contact US at
or Toll Free at 888-8TaxAid (888 882-9243).
 
 

 

Read more at: Tax Times blog

New GILTI and FDII International Tax Forms for 2018

International taxpayers will have to spend additional time on tax compliance with new forms for GILTI and FDII in 2018. 

 
The IRS recently issued Form 8992, U.S. Shareholder Calculation of Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI) for U.S. shareholders to compute their GILTI inclusion.  IRC Sec. 951A requires U.S. shareholders of CFCs (controlled foreign corporations) to include in gross income GILTI (Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income) for the tax years of the CFCs.  This reporting begins after December 31, 2017.
In addition, the IRS issued Form 8993 Section 250 Deduction for Foreign-Derived Intangible Income (FDII) and Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI) which taxpayers will use to determine their allowable deduction. New IRC Sec. 250 allows certain taxpayers to deduct an eligible percentage of FDII (Foreign-Derived Intangible Income) and GILTI.

New GILTI Form Is Final - New FDII Form Not Yet Final

The IRS has issued a new form, Form 8992, for doing the calculations with respect to Code Sec. 951A, which was enacted by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Code Sec. 951A requires U.S. shareholders of controlled foreign corporations to include in gross income the shareholder's global intangible low-taxed income. 
 
Only draft versions of the new FDII form and instructions are available for viewing at the IRS website. The IRS cautions taxpayers that the forms remain subject to change and require approval by the OMB (Office of Management and Budget) before final versions will be officially released.

Determining Who Must File Under IRC Sec. 951A & IRC Sec. 250

Form 8992 U.S. Shareholder Calculation of Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI) must be filed by any U.S. shareholder of one or more CFCs that must take into account its pro rata share of the CFCs tested income or tested loss in determining the U.S. shareholder’s GILTI inclusion under IRC Sec. 951A. This amount is taken from a CFC’s Form 5471, Schedule I-1.
For purposes of Form 8992:

  • A U.S. shareholder is a U.S. person that directly, indirectly, or constructively owns (within the meaning of IRC Sec. 958) at least 10% of the total value of shares of all classes of a CFC’s stock, or at least 10% of the total combined voting power of a CFC’s voting class stock; and,
  • a CFC is a foreign corporation with U.S. shareholders that directly, indirectly, or constructively own (within the meaning of IRC Sec. 958) on any day of the foreign corporation’s tax year more than 50% of the total value of the corporation’s stock, or the total combined voting power of all of its voting stock classes.

Form 8993 Section 250 Deduction for Foreign-Derived Intangible Income (FDII) and Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI) must be filed by all domestic corporations in order to determine the eligible deduction for FDII and GILTI allowed under IRC Sec. 250. The deduction is only available to domestic corporations (not including REITs (Real Estate Investment Trusts) or RICs (Regulated Invested Companies) and S corporations. The GILTI and FDII deductions from Form 8993 will also be entered on Form 1120, Schedule C.

Where and When to File

Both Forms 8992 and 8993 must be attached to the taxpayer’s income tax return and filed by the due date of the income tax return (including extensions). Any corrections to these forms may be included with an amended return.

Need International IRS Advice? 
 
   
Contact the Tax Lawyers at 
Marini & Associates, P.A. 
 
 
for a FREE Tax HELP contact us at:
Toll Free at 888-8TaxAid (888) 882-9243

 

Read more at: Tax Times blog

IRS Issues Updated New Form 5471 – What's New?

 On January 2, 2019 the IRS updated its webpage entitled Instructions for Form 5471 (12/2018) where it lays out the numerous changes caused by the TCJA of 2017, which have now been incorporated into the updated form. 

  •  On December 22, 2017, Congress enacted the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act," P.L. 115-97 (the "Act").
  • Act section 14101 enacted section 245A. Section 245A(e)(2) provides for a new subpart F inclusion for income from hybrid dividends of tiered corporations. As a result, new line 1b was added to Schedule I. See the instructions for Schedule I, line 1b for additional information. Also, as a result of Act section 14101(e), new lines 9 and 22 were added to separate Schedule M.
  • Act section 14102(c)(1) added section 964(e)(4), which provides for a new subpart F inclusion for dividend income from the sale of stock of a lower-tier foreign corporation. As a result, new line 1a was added to Schedule I. See the instructions for Schedule I, line 1a for additional information.
  • Act section 14103 amended section 965 to require certain taxpayers to include in income an amount (section 965(a) inclusion amount) based on the accumulated post-1986 deferred foreign income of certain foreign corporations that they own either directly or indirectly through other entities.
  • Act section 14201(a) enacted section 951A. This new code section requires U.S. shareholders of controlled foreign corporations (CFCs) to report the inclusion of global intangible low-taxed income (GILTI) for years in which they are U.S. shareholders of CFCs. Section 951A is effective for tax years of foreign corporations beginning after December 31, 2017, and to tax years of U.S. shareholders in which or with which such tax years of foreign corporations end. Use Form 8992, U.S. Shareholder Calculation of Global Intangible Low-Taxed income, to figure a U.S. shareholder’s GILTI inclusion. Also complete separate Schedule I-1 (Form 5471) to report information determined at the CFC level with respect to amounts used on Form 8992 in the determination of a U.S. shareholder's GILTI inclusion.
  • Act section 14201(b)(2)(A) amended section 904(d)(1) by adding a new foreign tax credit limitation separate category for section 951A income. As a result, Schedules, E, J, and P, for example, may be completed for this new separate category, if applicable.
  • Act section 14202 enacted section 250, which allows certain domestic corporations a deduction for the eligible percentage of foreign-derived intangible income (FDII) and GILTI. Section 250 is effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017. Use Form 8993, Section 250 Deduction for Foreign-Derived Intangible Income (FDII) and Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI), to figure this deduction. 
  • Act section 14211 amended section 954(a) to eliminate foreign base company oil related income from the calculation of foreign base company income. As a result, Worksheet A and instructions were modified.
  • Act section 14212 repealed the section 955 subpart F inclusion based on withdrawal of previously excluded subpart F income from qualified investment. As a result, old line 3 of Schedule I was deleted. Also, old Worksheet C and instructions were deleted. Also note that old Worksheet D is now Worksheet C.
  • Act section 14214 amended section 951(b) to modify the definition of U.S. shareholder, and Act section 14213 amended section 958(b) to modify attribution rules applicable for determining whether a U.S. person is a U.S. shareholder and whether a foreign corporation is a CFC.
  • Act section 14215 amended section 951(a)(1) by eliminating the requirement that a CFC must be controlled for 30 days before subpart F inclusions apply. As a result, the definition of Category 5 filer has been amended.
  • Act section 14222 enacted section 267A. Under section 267A, a deduction for certain interest or royalty paid or accrued to a related party pursuant to a hybrid transaction or by, or to, a hybrid entity may be disallowed to the extent the related party, under its tax laws, does not include the amount in income or is allowed a deduction with respect to the amount.
  • Act section 14301 repealed section 902 (deemed paid credits with respect to dividends) and amended section 960 (deemed paid credits for subpart F inclusions and GILTI inclusions). As a result, we amended Schedules E and J, and related instructions.
  • Act section 14401 enacted section 59A, Tax on Base Erosion Payments of Taxpayers with Substantial Gross Receipts. The new section 59A imposes on each applicable taxpayer a tax equal to the base erosion minimum tax amount for the tax year. Section 59A applies to base erosion payments paid or accrued in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017.

Form 5471 Changes 
  1. Category 1 (previously reserved) is now used by U.S. shareholders of specified foreign corporations (SFCs) subject to the provisions of section 965.
  2. Schedule B, Part II, is new. It is used to provide information about direct shareholders of the foreign corporation. For details, see specific instructions for Schedule B, Part II, later.
  3. Schedule C, lines 8a and 8b are new. These lines are used to report foreign currency transaction gain or loss. Lines 19 through 24 are either new or reworded to reflect updated GAAP rules.
  4. Schedule F, lines 3 and 17 are new. They are used to report derivatives. They were added to reflect the rules of Act section 14103 (specifically, derivatives are considered cash for section 965 purposes).
  5. Schedule G, lines 4, 5, and 6 are new. These lines are used to answer questions about base erosion payments and benefits under section 59A, interest or royalty amounts paid or accrued for which the deduction is disallowed under section 267A, and foreign-derived intangible income deductions under section 250. These lines were added to reflect Act sections 14401, 14222, and 14202, respectively.
  6. Schedule G, lines 9, 10, 11, and 12 are new. These lines are used to answer questions about cost sharing arrangements. These lines were added to reflect Regulations section 1.482-7.
  7. Schedule G, line 13 is new. This line is used to answer a question about triangular reorganizations within the meaning of Regulations section 1.358-6(b)(2).
  8. Schedule G, lines 14a and 14b are new. These lines are used to answer questions about transfers of intangibles. These lines were added to reflect section 367(d).
  9. Schedule G, line 15 is new. This line is used to answer a question about whether the foreign corporation is an expatriated foreign subsidiary under Regulations section 1.7874-12(a)(9).
  10. Schedule G, line 19 is new. It refers filers to a series of questions in the instructions for line 19. For each question for which the answer is “Yes,” the filer is required to enter the corresponding code from the instructions and attach a statement.
  11. Schedule I, line 1a is new. This line is used to report section 964(e)(4) subpart F dividend income inclusions. Line 1a was added to reflect Act section 14102(c)(1).
  12. Schedule I, line 1b is new. This line is used to report section 245A(e)(2) subpart F income inclusions. Line 1b was added to reflect Act section 14101(a).
  13. Old line 3 of Schedule I was deleted to reflect the repeal of the section 955 subpart F inclusion. This line was deleted to reflect Act section 14212.
  14. Schedules E and H are now separate schedules (no longer part of the base Form 5471) because these schedules must now be completed separately for each applicable category of income. New lines a and b have been added to these schedules to identify the category of income for which a given Schedule E or H is being completed. Furthermore, these schedules have been expanded as explained below.
  15. Separate Schedule E has been expanded to request information pertaining to taxes for which a foreign tax credit is allowed and taxes for which a credit may not be taken. Furthermore, the schedule includes new Schedule E-1, which is used to report the current year changes in the cumulative balances of foreign income taxes paid or accrued by the CFC. For details, see specific instructions for Schedule E, later.
  16. Separate Schedule H, line 2h is new. Line 2h is used to report foreign currency gains or losses.
  17. Separate Schedule I-1 is new. It is used to report information with respect to amounts used in the determination of GILTI inclusions by U.S. shareholders under section 951A. For details, see specific instructions for Schedule I-1, later.
  18. Separate Schedule J was expanded so that it also can be used to report accumulated E&P balances with respect to categories of previously taxed E&P resulting from the new types of income added by the Act (such as section 965(a) inclusions and GILTI inclusions).
  19. Separate Schedule M, lines 9 and 22 are new. They are used to report hybrid dividends received and paid. These lines were added to reflect Act section 14101 (e). Lines 27 and 29 are also new. They are used to report accounts payable and accounts receivable.
  20. Separate Schedule P is new. It is used to report previously taxed E&P of the U.S. shareholder of a CFC or SFC (see Category 1 Filer, below, for a definition of SFC). For more information, see the specific instructions for Schedule P, later.
  21. Certain schedules must be completed separately for each applicable category of income. They are Schedules E, H, I-1, J, and P.
  22. Note that Schedule M continues to be completed separately for each CFC.
 
Need International Tax Advice for Your Form 5471?
Contact the Tax Lawyers at 
Marini & Associates, P.A.
 
for a FREE Tax Consultation
or Toll Free at 888-8TaxAid (888 882-9243)
 
 
 
 

Read more at: Tax Times blog